dancingcoyote

arsanatomica:

The skull of the Chinese Water Deer is one of the most iconic skulls out there. 

Like many small Asian deer species, it does not have antlers. Instead the males fight each other with their extremely sharp tusks, slashing at rivals with downward head swings. 

When not actively shanking others, the tusks can be folded back slightly., so they don’t interfere with eating. 

strangebiology
strangebiology:

sickroomcookery:

The marsupial lion was a highly specialised carnivore, as is reflected in its dentition (teeth). Like other diprotodonts, it possessed enlarged incisors on both the upper (maxillae) and lower (mandibles) jaws. These teeth (the lower in particular) were shaped much more like the pointed canine teeth of animals such as dogs and cats than those of kangaroos. The most unusual feature of the creature’s dentition were the huge, blade-like carnassial premolars on either side of its jaws. The top and bottom carnassials worked together like shears and would have been very effective at slicing off chunks of flesh from carcasses and cutting through bone.
[wiki]

Wow! Even though reconstructions of marsupial lions look phenotypically similar to placental (regular) lions, holy COW do their skulls ever look different! Look at those weird teeth and eye sockets!

strangebiology:

sickroomcookery:

The marsupial lion was a highly specialised carnivore, as is reflected in its dentition (teeth). Like other diprotodonts, it possessed enlarged incisors on both the upper (maxillae) and lower (mandibles) jaws. These teeth (the lower in particular) were shaped much more like the pointed canine teeth of animals such as dogs and cats than those of kangaroos. The most unusual feature of the creature’s dentition were the huge, blade-like carnassial premolars on either side of its jaws. The top and bottom carnassials worked together like shears and would have been very effective at slicing off chunks of flesh from carcasses and cutting through bone.

[wiki]

Wow! Even though reconstructions of marsupial lions look phenotypically similar to placental (regular) lions, holy COW do their skulls ever look different! Look at those weird teeth and eye sockets!

mydeadthingsdiary

mydeadthingsdiary:

And on an even happier note: silver tabbies patch of fur is all done! Tanned, stretched and broken inbetween working the last two days, and it’s come out better than I could have hoped! :D

Two small stains from the car impact, but the texture of the tan feels the closest to professional leather than of all the pelts I have tanned so far. And all I did was skin, salt for 12 hrs, deflesh cleanly, tan for 72hrs, apply softening oil and allowed to dry slowly over the course of a couple of days, gently tugging and pulling to stretch it! Defleshing cleanly made a big difference (you can feel where I didn’t clean up to the edges) and the oil as well. But I’m wondering if the slow drying also was a factor….

Bottom left photo is to show how soft and supple the tan is (ignore my apparently super red hand, the camera colour balance weirded out on me). 

And bottom right … well, he is a cat. So in typical cat fashion, he’s shedding fur everywhere >:C I exaggerate, it’s minimal shedding. I just need to give him a brush to get the loose hairs out ^^

But yes! I am very pleased with how the tan turned out, and happy to see his gorgeous mackerel silver tabby pattern